Tag Archives: film

How To Navigate The Lomo La Sardina Flash. Laid Out in Black & White

18th August 2012

I’m a couple of rolls into using my Lomo La Sardina camera and am loving it more and more! Of all the rolls I’ve shot, I think my last roll of black and white film, may be my favorite of all the results.

I usually don’t care much for using the flash but unless you’re subject is burning alive in direct sunlight, I’m starting to realize the flash is pretty necessary for a distinguishable shot with the La Sardina. Thats fine by me, because I love the harsh look of flash on a black and white photo!  So I loaded up my toy camera with Kodak T-MAX  100 film. To be honest, I went in looking for 400, but I couldn’t seem to find it anywhere I looked. (The diminishment of film accessibility has become so sad.) But I was really happy with the fuzzy, contrasted, and pretty erie looking results I got.

Shooting black and white was a good way to distinguish the differences in flash ranges, since it’s easier to focus in on just light without being distracted by if the color is being washed out. I tried all the settings and heres some examples of how they turned out, as displayed through my favorite male model!

Flash setting: 1/1

Flash setting: 1/2

Flash setting: 1/8

Flash setting: well, there was no flash on this one. I shot it right around sunset and had forgotten to turn it onto 1/8, which I’m glad I did because I like how evenly the light was laid out.

Heres what happened when I tried the photo again with the setting I thought I wanted. Not only did I not like the result, but I also had to treat Alex like he was on a reality show when I said “Hey, can you please act like you’re still looking in the window?”

Modeling our Chloe Rice & Alex Pardee shirt, as the sun photo bombed the shot..The sun also did a lovely job at photo bombing this photo from the Redwoods. I loved the warped bubble and the light leak in the bottom corner.

Why, yes! That is a 727 in the middle of a forest!


How To Blur Photo Rules With A Sardine Can

17th June 2012

I’ve owned far too many Lomo cameras, through out the years. I like the idea that each toy camera can give a photo a completely different look. The control freak in me doesn’t really care for how completely unfocused that look usually ends up despite my efforts to create the stillest environment for a shot.

My friend Derek is absolutely amazing with the Lomo Sprocket Rocket and when we got to talking about how blurry all the rest of their cameras are, the La Sardina came up. It was a brand new addition to Lomo, at the time. Its an easy to use 35mm camera that was modeled to look like a sardine can. Apparently, the focal point can be pretty sharp, and it has a wide angle that isn’t so intense that it leaves your photo with black corners and everything else in a bubble, like their fisheye does.

Ever since then, I’ve been lurking around on blogs and Flickr accounts of La Sardina owners. Day dreaming. Last week, a friend of mine who works with Lomo said he had one that wasn’t getting much use and allowed me to test it out indefinitely. It was a very happy day in Brooklyn.

He packed it with a roll of 800 speed film, that rad looking fog horn of a flash, and a couple of flash filters.  I spent the next day walking around the city flipping its switches and knobs, recklessly. Maybe, due to my excitement, I did it a bit too recklessly. I got my film back and felt like I was looking into fogged glass after drinking a bottle of cheap vodka. Most of them were unrecognizably blurry.

I told Alex how discouraged I was with the results, and he gave me some great obvious insight. First he asked “Did you use the flash on them?” I responded after a long pause. A pause that I used to figure out if he had somehow magically seen my photos before me, all the way over in California and was being a smart ass (turns out he was just being smart) ”Only for one…the only one that came out clear…”

the settings I used for said photo.

Then he brought up another good point. He reminded me that not all photos have to be in focus to be an interesting photo.

He’s right. Its something that I’ve let myself forget through out the years of shooting and trying to always improve myself. I’ve grown so accustom to my digital SLR where I have control over everything in order to make the photo look exactly how I want to. I then remembered that I wanted this camera to learn with. To take something that I could only choose between two focal points (far away and close up) and challenge myself to make that photo recognizable as my own despite the natural way the camera functions.

At that point, I went back over the photos I took and realized that I do like some of them, quite a bit! So myy new little La Sardina is already restocked with some of my favorite color saturated film (Kodak Portra 400), the flash is stuffed with a brand new battery, and I’m ready to continue to let go of control and have fun with my new fun toy!

Heres some of my favorite photos from my first attempt with the La Sardina:




My Kodak Moments

5th May 2012

I’m so glad that there’s almost always been a camera around to capture some of my lifes most captivating adventures but ever since Kodak filed for bankruptcy, back in January, I can’t help but be a little stressed that soon some of these moments may not exist in the same way.

However, my optimistic mindset has kept me thinking of how to make the most out of what little time I may have left with a dumb ole’ plastic camera. So with disposable Kodak camera , a consistent sugar high, and a vivid imagination, I spent the past couple of months taking in some Kodak moments. Heres three of my favorites for my personal album:

The moment that I met the very photogenic Michael Jackson.

A moment from when I got captured by a demanding bear with a fetish for PDA.

And the moment in which I realized that I will never be able to look up someones pants.